Updating the House List

A few months back, I made a list of everything I wanted to accomplish with my sweet little apartment. As a refresher, this is what the floor plan looks like:

floor plan

I gave a little update here, about where I’m at with the original list. Realistically, though, a lot has changed since creating that list: my work, my daily schedule, etc. So, the other day, I was getting ready to leave the house, and I snapped some pictures of the spaces that need some serious love.

 

Clearly, it was dark out and some of these photos just really aren’t great, but you get the general idea: chaos.

I spent some time with these pictures, and my list and I decided I needed to think about it differently. Some things needed to go, and some things needed to be more deeply examined. So, here’s the old list and where I was at:

  1. Talk to sisters about coffee table
  2. D – wtf is with this bean bag chair??
  3. Find home for reusable bags
  4. Bed frame to moms house
  5. Hang towel hooks in bedroom
  6. Find new home for donations
  7. COUCH
  8. Arrange bedside table
  9. Lower super high shower shelf
  10. Revamp system for online selling – I’m just done with selling things online, I think.
  11. Get a rug – $45
  12. Refinish coffee table – $20
  13. Get Bedroom Art – in process
  14. Replace the trunk with a dresser that can hold DVDs – in process
  15. Make desk a workable space
  16. Move off kitchen table
  17. Window treatment for sliding glass doors
  18. Reorganize Bathroom closet
  19. Upgrade the trunk
  20. Reupholster dining room chairs – meh. I don’t really need to do this…

But a new list is forming.

“Study”

I call the little nook where my desk is my Study or Office (sorry for the horrible photo quality – I took these at like, 5am).

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Some things here are great: I played musical desks with my parents and ended up with their much bigger desk. It’s working well but there’s still stuff everywhere, including that bean bag chair (not pictured) I still haven’t talked to D about.

The desk chair was at my mothers secretary when I was little. My sisters and I played on it. It’s really… not that comfortable to do homework in. I don’t want to get rid of it, because I would like to have it in my real house someday, but I want somewhere more comfortable to sit.

That pile of sparkly notebooks is for my classes this semester. They pretty much need to be at the desk, but they don’t need to be piled all crazy-like in the corner. I think that when I finish the TV Stand I can move the trunk under the desk as a combo foot stool / school work organizer

  1. Talk to D about that bean bag chair.
  2. Find home for desk chair
  3. Purchase more comfortable desk chair
  4. Find home for school binders/books when not in use.

Family Room

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I found this much better picture than the one above. Even though it’s been a few months, this is a pretty accurate presentation of what this looks like.

Some items from the above list are staying on here. I think I want to upholster the coffee table though, rather than just refinishing it. D isn’t in love with the idea, but I think it could be really cool.  I also want some art for above the television, and I’m not sure about those iron chairs.

  1. Get a rug – $45
  2. Refinish / upholster coffee table – $40
  3. Replace the truck with a dresser that can hold DVDs – in process
  4. Window treatment for sliding glass doors
  5. Upgrade the trunk
  6. Art for above the TV
  7. Make an iron chair decision

Bathroom

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What is even happening here? Towels are folded all crazy. Bins are overflowing, there’s a crochet project at the bottom. What. the. heck. I realized that I was saying “Reorganize” but I wasn’t breaking that down into smaller pieces that make it easier.

  1. Reorganize bathroom closet
    1. Make better use of under the sink space
    2. Consider putting towels out, not in linen closet
    3. Purchase additional bins to better sort
    4. THROW THINGS AWAY
    5. Dedicated crochet spot?

Bedroom

 

So, in the summertime, this is what the bedroom looks like: no quilt. I don’t actually care because it’s too hot to have a big quilt on there. But I’d like to warm up the bed a little. There’s a lot of blue and white happening.

There’s another crochet project on the ground. Pj’s on the foot board. Sketches of actual art hung with push pins. Those dressers are from my moms closet. And those metal lamps are hers and don’t really work with the space. And there are two chairs on either side of the tallboy that just collect…things.

  1. Warm up the bed – brown blanket? Different color sheets?
  2. Spot for Pj’s – maybe train myself to hang by towels
  3. Get Bedroom Art – in process
    1. Finish paintings
    2. Make frames
  4. New end tables – I want to build these, but need to assess what we really need.
  5. New lamps
  6. Spot for quilt in the summer
  7. Home for D’s robe

The Storage Closet

I like, don’t even want to talk about this closet.

Ugh. But I probably should.

Ugh. Seriously, I stopped writing this for a while because I just don’t want to think about it.

The Pantry

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The pantry actually works really well. It looks crazy because there’s a thousand small things on it. And there’s stuff on the floor. I got a Costco membership and my little pantry isn’t really built for Costco, I guess.

I know that one of the problems is that things are stacked on other things because the shelves are wire. I think I could easily solve this by lining them with foamcore, or something similar. I also think it would help to put certain things (pastas, rices) into canisters that could be stacked and, honestly, I’d like the chips up top to be in big baskets. There are two rows of snacks like that and I’m 5″2′. My rice cakes often get buried behind D’s Doritos and I end up purchasing things I don’t need as a result.

Now that I’m thinking about it, that would be smart to do with the cereal too. I don’t eat cereal, but I’ve noticed that D will buy a bunch of one kind from Costco and then one smaller box of something sweet from the grocery store. So, probably a cereal canister too.

And now that I’m looking at it, I’m realizing that my spices have way over-grown the small-sized baking sheet they’re on. I want to be able to hang something to hold them all, but I haven’t figured that out yet.

  1. Line shelves with foamcore
  2. Purchase canisters for dry goods
  3. Baskets for chips/snacks
  4. Purchase cereal canister
  5. Figure out spices

Okay, so this isn’t really that many things, it just feels overwhelming. This is why we write things down, people. 🙂

The Storage Part

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So, the vacuum and Christmas Tree pretty much have to be there because there isn’t another home for them. Which blows. You can also kind of see that there are boxes in front of the vacuum – that stack is a flat of coke, a box of protein shakes, and a box of single-serving nuts. This is how the pantry complicates things.

There’s also a bag of pop cans. In Michigan, you pay an extra $0.10 for every can / bottle you buy, but then you submit them to the bottle return and get your $0.10 back, so we hold on to the bottles. There’s another bag in the coat closet that’s in the process of being filled. I’m not pleased with any of this. I think I need to either start taking the cans to the store every time there’s a full bag and saving the bottle slips, or I need to ask D to take them to his shop so that they aren’t stored at home.

On that low shelf, there’s foods I’ve canned, which are stacked nicely. That’s fine. But then there are weird like, pasta jars with a humidifier on top of them, next to a printer.

I need to toss some stuff.

And make a shelf.

The same thing goes for the next shelf. There’s a stack of board games, which is great, but then it’s all crazy. I know part of the problem is the pile of stuff in front of the storage space, but shelves actually would help a lot.

  1. Figure out cans.
  2. THROW THINGS AWAY
  3. Build shelves

The List

So I’ve got my list for each room. I’m going to follow the same process I used to organize the last list and put this in priority order. Here’s the new end result, with the items from the original list in green:

  1. Replace the truck with a dresser that can hold DVDs – in process
  2. Find home for school binders/books when not in use
  3. Get Bedroom Art – in process
    1. Finish paintings
    2. Make frames
  4. Talk to D about that bean bag chair.
  5. Reorganize bathroom closet
    1. Make better use of under the sink space
    2. Consider putting towels out, not in linen closet
    3. Purchase additional bins to better sort
    4. THROW THINGS AWAY
    5. Dedicated crochet spot?
  6. Warm up the bed
  7. Spot for PJ’s
  8. Figure out cans in Storage Closet
  9. Throw things away in the storage closet
  10. Line shelves with foamcore
  11. Home for D’s Robe
  12. Refinish / upholster coffee table – $40
  13. Build shelves for Storage Closet
  14. Make an Iron Chair decision
  15. Art for above the TV
  16. Spot for quilt in the summer
  17. Purchase canisters for dry goods
  18. Baskets for chips/snacks
  19. Purchase cereal canister
  20. Figure out spices
  21. Find home for desk chair
  22. Get a rug – $45
  23. Window treatment for sliding glass doors
  24. Upgrade the trunk
  25. Purchase more comfortable desk chair
  26. New end tables
  27. New lamps

It feels a little overwhelming! But I think it will go quicker than I expect. I’ll keep you posted!

A. Rose (1)

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Budget Tip: Christmas in September

There’s nothing like trying to find ways to save money when you don’t make much money. These budget series posts were created out of the desire to share what I have learned about alleviating some of the soul-crushing stress of living paycheck to paycheck – and the things I’ve learned that have helped me move away from that life. Please note that I am not, in any way, a licensed financial professional. None of these tips are guaranteed to make you money or save you money; they’re simply different ways of thinking about and using money that one person who doesn’t make much has learned over time.


Christmas in September

I love Christmas. I love twinkly lights and freshly baked cookies and laughing with my sisters so hard we cry and giving presents. I want to give all the presents in the world.

Last year, D and I went in 50/50 on presents. With five parents, nine siblings (including brothers-in-law) and six kiddos we adore, 50/50 still added up to a whole bunch really fast.

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We set different price caps based on how our families work, or what parents would prefer for their children. This year, I went the homemade route for my sisters and mom to save some cash. I made them personalized hand towels and hot pads that match their kitchens. I really prefer this, and will be doing it again this year.

 

For everyone else, though, we bought from the store.

So why bother talking about this now? Because I bought my first Christmas present in July.

Yep.

Tip #1: Shop Early & Often

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D and I had certain things we knew we wanted to get for folks – things like a nice set of towels, or classic, wooden toys for specific age ranges. So, every paycheck, we either buy something or set aside money for when we figure it out. That way, it doesn’t feel like we’re suddenly bleeding a ton of money, we don’t have to rush to the stores during the crazy holiday season, and we can spend our time doing things for others, like taking on an extra dish for a family event so our moms don’t have to, or planning a family service trip. Which leads me to my next tip:

Tip #2: Plan it Out

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There’s an (a) and a (b) to this idea.
(a) When it comes to time, start writing down your Holiday events as soon as you find out they exist. You can use an electronic or paper calendar. But make sure you include time for things like getting ready, driving to and from (especially if there’s snow) and rest. For goodness sake, make sure you allow yourself space and time for rest. Write it in now, as you’re reading this even. Maybe I’ll do a post with more details about how I plan this out in the future. Would that be something you’d enjoy?

(b.1) I have been using this holiday gift tracker from IHeart Organizing since it came out a few years ago (six years? Maybe?).

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I print it out at the start of the year and as I think of a gift, I write it down. For example, D and I went to Florida in March and saw something we just know his nephews will love, but it wasn’t Florida-y enough for us to buy as their trip-gift. So I wrote it on here so we wouldn’t forget.
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(b.2) The gift tracker is amazing because it doesn’t let you spend too much. I actually keep the “budget” and “actual” columns filled in as the year goes along. But, I keep a running “presents” lists on Amazon too. This has things like the nursery rhyme book is always get for babies, and things that could work well for a birthday party for a coworkers kid that I don’t really know. I also pop Christmas presents there.
In the case of the Florida gift for D’s nephews, I added it to this list while we were looking at it.

Tip #3: Plan to Wrap Away!

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So, this is going to sound nuts, but I actually bought wrapping paper in August. And March. I love cutesy paper for kiddos and will probably do that forever, but for my family – which doesn’t have younger children – I usually go with some kind of Hallmark swirly, classy, beautiful paper (like the top photo). So when I find a coupon or see a sale, I grab some up.

This goes for bags too. The Christmas themed ones are adorable and I definitely buy them. But I also buy the five-pack of brown gift bags and add embellishments in the same colors as my papers.

I also buy the cutesy paper at the start of the year, usually, when it all goes on sale. I’ve done that paper different ways and always end up needing to buy extra of it, so I just try to account for it in the budget.

One of my sisters wrapped all her presents in butcher paper for many years, and spent her money on ribbons and dried flowers. Her gifts always look gorgeous. I had a year where I bought a bunch of white tissue paper at the dollar store and then hand-made my gift tags with brightly colored construction paper. Thinking outside the box is another helpful way to save.

I write gift wrapping into my planner on the day after I plan to have all my gifts bought and I put on a cheesy Christmas movie or some music and wrap all in one session. It’s like a backwards Christmas surprise when I wake up the next morning to a tree full of presents for other people – exactly the kind of gift I want to give myself!

What kinds of things do you do to save money at the holidays?

A. Rose (1)

& Cookies

I’ve been an avid blog reader for the last six years and my favorite posts are always the personal, here’s-my-life-in-the-last-month-rounded-up kinds of things. I was thinking about this, and about my cousins son whose favorite time of the day is Cookie Time, where he, his mom and his grandma have milk and cookies. So I was thinking about the idea of having milk and cookies with people I like, but I stopped being able to drink milk around age 25, so here we are: & cookies.

You can read the rest of the series here, here, here and here


The past two weeks have been hectic, to say the least! With school starting the last week of August, everything in my life shifted a little bit to accommodate for what was new.

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I try to always get myself something at the start of the school year, almost like a pre-reward. It’s silly to do maybe, but I try to remember that, at this stage in life, even just registering for classes is a choice that isn’t always easy to make. I’ve wanted a pair of these earrings for a while, and when Natalie posted a coupon code, it seemed like a good time to jump on it.

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With school back in session, my commute has gotten about 15 minutes longer, each way. I drive through beautiful farm country, but sometimes find myself behind strange objects. I try to remember that I take this route for the experience – I’m used to palm trees and strip malls – and find it humorous. But my music has been getting a little stale lately. Any suggestions for great driving songs?

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I’ve given up on wearing dressy shoes to work. These sandals are so amazing that I cannot stop with them. You may have seen my Instagram post about them. I’ve been trying to post things to Instagram. To be completely transparent: I’m not great at it. I’m open to any advice folks have. I keep trying to remember that it’s a great way to keep in touch with folks and, really, it’s a lot easier to use than Facebook.

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Look at this perfect photo of my adorable dad and his dog, Maggie. I’ve been working on that TV stand that I talked about a while ago (I promise a great reveal post is coming soon!) and my parents hung out a bunch. That blue swing was my great-grandmas! My uncle recently had it repainted and surprised my mom with it! How freaking cute?

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I recently posted about getting my brain organized for school. I am juggling a lot of different things lately and trying to stay grounded while I do it. I think some of my struggle has to do with not having a planner that works 100% the way I need it to. So, I’m back to thinking about making my own.

I hope you all have been well. I’d love to hear what back-to-school time has been like for you!

A. Rose (1)

How to Budget When You’re (Close to) Broke

Ahhhh… Money. Everyone’s favorite topic, right?

Ugh.

It’s one of my least favorite things to talk about. But as I’ve been writing these posts, I’ve realized how much of my behavior is dictated by trying to save money in these little ways. So I thought it might be helpful to write these things down. Maybe make a little series of it.

Here’s the thing though: I’m not a financial adviser or banker or accountant. I’m just a young person who has mostly worked in education and has only managed to make over $11 / hour in the last two year years. If you need serious financial counsel, I highly recommend you consult a professional. But if you just want to learn how to not be freaked out about money all the time, these tips might help.

Copy of Christmas in September

There’s a lot out there on how to make a little side money, and things that people will tell you (like turning off lights in the room you’re not in) to pinch pennies and legit – those things are great and I definitely recommend that you do them.

But there’s this other piece that people don’t know about, I think: how to not feel afraid when it’s time to pay the rent; how to purchase groceries in a way to make sense; and how to still be able to go out with your friends everyone once in a while.

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I’ll be real honest: its taken me almost six months to write this because the topic of money stresses me out so much. So we’re in this fear together. Let’s start with the real game-changer: actually making a budget.

What’s a budget?

A budget is a detailed list of expected income / expenses. Your income and expenses should match. Start by listing every expense you can think of. For me this looks something like this:

Rent
Utilities
Cable & Internet
Credit Card
Medical
Gas
Food
Fun
Fun food
School Book Money
Misc.

Note: You always want to have a “misc” category – that’s where things like birthday presents come from.

Then, add in the “fixed” rates. So let’s say we have $1000 to work with (because that’s easier). Fill-in what you know isn’t going to change:

Rent: $400
Utilities
Cable & Internet: $80
Credit Card: $25
Medical
Gas
Food
Fun
Fun food
School Book Money: $10 (I know I’ll need X amount of money each semester, so I set a small amount aside each month)
Misc.

That’s $515, so you have $485 left over. Next, overestimate each of your monthly bills.

Rent: $400
Utilities: $50
Cable & Internet: $80
Credit Card: $25 (minimum payment)
Medical: $50
Gas
Food
Fun
Fun food
School Book Money: $10
Misc.

Notice the things that aren’t bills. Those are the things you can flex and challenge yourself to bring down.

So now, we’re at $615, meaning we have $385 leftover. I typically do gas before food, because gas gets me to the job that lets me buy the food. I also have a lengthy commute. If you don’t, or if you have a family to feed, you might need to do food first. Estimate how much you think you spend each month on those things:

Rent: $400
Utilities: $50
Cable & Internet: $80
Credit Card: $25 (minimum payment)
Medical: $50
Gas: $60
Food: $100
Fun
Fun food
School Book Money: $10
Misc.

So now we’re at $775, meaning we have $225 leftover. So, that looks like a lot of money to have fun with. Except we’ve only listed expenses. We haven’t listed savings. Month-to-month, my Fun, Fun food, and Misc category change.

There are seven birthdays in the first two weeks of August, so July has a pretty big Misc. section, but Fun as like, $10 in it because I spend so much time just being outside (which is free).

You can do this two ways: you can decide you’re going to save a specific amount and the remainder goes to fun, or you can decide you’re going to spend a specific amount and the remainder goes to savings.

Giving you the option is really counter to what literally everyone says about money, including my dad who taught me how to make a budget.

What I’ve learned over the years, though, is that you will never stick to a budget that isn’t honest. For most of my life, my Fun Food category was four times the size of my actual Food category because I hated cooking. It didn’t feel “grown up” to have things arranged that way, but it did keep me in check.

Those are the basics. What do you think? What about this is scary or feels good or is both at the same time?

A. Rose (1)

Mind / Body / Spirit

I’ve been wanting to write down my thoughts on the connection between the mind, body and spirit for a long time, but I haven’t been able to find the words lately.

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I’m a pretty dedicated user of the HeadSpace app, I’ve been doing yoga since I was 15 and I work really hard at loving my body for the life it gives me.

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I started out thinking I’d like to write a post about what I believe the connection between the two is, how to facilitate it and what to do when you fall off-course. But, I decided that instead of that, I’d rather hear from you: what do you do to calm down? What provides balance in your life? What little things are part of your day that without them you would be struggling?

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For me, some of those things include: meditation, yoga, being barefoot, making lists, singing and laughing. I’ve been trying to focus more on being balanced. I tend to take on too much and then later wonder why I’m overwhelmed (how many of you can relate?). So I’m interested in hearing from you. Let me know in the comments how you stay balanced.

A. Rose (1)

Quick Fix Friday: Trading Spaces

This post is part of my Quick Fix Friday Series. The Quick Fix Friday Series is comprised of cheap and simple tricks to make your life easier. I started this series because I often feel like I have no time to make a change in my apartment, and I wanted to remind myself that it’s true. I also have realized that while there is a plethora of information about quick fixes when you own a house, that isn’t necessarily true when you live in an apartment. Each of these tasks takes under five minutes.

QFF_ Trading Spaces

You might remember my little galley kitchen from my Apartment Tour post.

It looks something like this:

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When you’re a renter, there’s not much you can do about 70’s faux-wood cabIinets with cream counter tops, so you just have to appreciate your kitchen for its’ deep sink, massive storage (relative to the size of the space) and random potato drawer that makes you smile.

I took this photo on a day when things were kind of just how they are – not when I was just done cooking, but not when I had just finished cleaning – because I want this to be an honest space.

So, what’s not lovely is what happens when D comes in and all the things in his hands go on the counter in front of the microwave, which means the microwave can’t be used without moving all those things. I usually don’t notice until I’m in the middle of cooking something and my hands are full. Then, I get frustrated.

So I went through a thousand ideas: should D have a backpack? should I chill out? should I ask him to put things somewhere else? does that fit with my ideas of organic organizing? What about a shelf in the front hall? Do I even need a microwave? The questions kept coming.

Then, one day, I just decided to move the microwave and man-oh-man was it the right decision!

Updated Counter

This may not look like much, especially since there are still items on the counter, but f’rill – it’s a HUGE change. Now there’s space on the counter for dinner dishes that need to be washed; there’s still space on the right side of the sink to prep foods; and, best of all, D’s stack of items is no longer in front of the thing I need.

So just a little reminder that sometimes the best solution is the simplest.

What kinds of things have you switched around that made a big impact?

Thirty Minute Dinner: Stir Fry

This post is part of my 30 Minute Meal Series. The 30 Minute Meal Series is comprised of recipes that either take 30 minutes or less of hands-on time. I started this series because I believe that good food doesn’t have to take forever, but what should be forever is the impact that sharing this food with others and your body has on your life.

30 Minute Stir Fry

This meal was born out of boredom: I was tired of the food I was eating. I wanted veggies, but I didn’t want them raw. I pretty much always want rice. I needed something warm because it was week 4,098,204,495 of snow in the tundra I live in. So, I decided that I could probably make stir fry even though I had no idea how to do it.

I understood the basics enough – I know veggies have to cook longer than rice does. And I know you add soy sauce. Everything else in this meal is flexible, and based almost entirely out of what’s in my house already – feel free to make the changes you need to make!

img_4689First, I set some rice to boil. This whole meal only takes five minutes more than it takes to make rice. Caveat: I keep chopped onion and carrots in my fridge all the time and have a garlic press. If you don’t do/have those things (a) I recommend them and (b) you have to also account for chopping garlic and onions in your process.
If you want to do what I actually did next the first time I made this for this post, you should then dump out the rice because your boyfriend decided to take you to a steakhouse instead. Then, start over again the next day. #eyeroll #itwasworthit

If you need to chop onions, carrots and/or garlic, you should do that now. I use about a quarter of an onion, one and a half large carrots (five-ish baby carrots) and five cloves of garlic but everyone’s pallet and tummy is different – just do what’s right for you!

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Then, put some oil in the biggest pan you have and heat it up on medium. So far as I can tell, it doesn’t actually matter what oil you use (it’ll change the flavor some, but get creative!). After a few seconds, add the chopped onion and give it a little stir.

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While the onions are cooking, chop your protein into cubes or strips. It doesn’t matter which one. Just try to remember the last stir fry you ate and which it had and copy that.

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Add the garlic and the carrots. If you don’t have carrots, don’t sweat it! We’re gonna add some frozen mixed vegetables soon, which also usually have carrots. Stir them around a little – maybe about 2-3 minutes. You just want to soften the carrots a little.

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But first! Add your protein. You can see I kind of pushed the veggies to one side. I like to be sure that the meat got cooked on all sides before continuing and it’s just easier this way. You don’t have to do that – you’ll be cooking meat for nearly 25 minutes so it’s very unlikely that it won’t be cooked through. Once it’s cooked on all sides (if you’re using tofu or another plant-based protein don’t worry about it), move on to the next step!

This time, I happened to have sugar snap peas and water chestnuts (D asked that we try them next time we made stir fry) in my house so I added those. Stir them around for about 1-2 minutes or as long as it takes you to get frozen mixed veggies out of your freezer and some kind of nut out of your pantry.

I use about half a small bag of mixed veggies because I have the carrots and water chestnuts. If you don’t, or you just really like veggies, add more! Just about anything goes with this stir fry. I also usually add either a very small amount of ghost pepper or Hot Shot at this point. We like spice in this house, but you definitely don’t have to do that.
This time, I used sunflower seeds because I had them. I’ve used cashews, pecans and almonds before. I don’t recommend the pecans. They were a little too pecan-y and threw the texture off, but you do you!
Check on your rice – how’s it looking? Can you hear it bubbling still? You want the rice to be a little wet still, so that you don’t dry it out too much when you cook it. Turn it off before it’s all the way done.

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Add your rice! Just dump the whole thing on your veggies and give it a good stir! Then, add some soy sauce. I add about three long shakes of the bottle – it’s probably about a quarter cup. Depending on how much salt you like/eat, do more or less.

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This part gets tricky. I move all the veggies to one side like I did for the meat and add some eggs. This makes a lot of stir fry and I usually take it for lunch for a few days, so I add four eggs. I actually push the pan so that the eggs are the main thing getting the heat, then add salt and pepper.

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I just scramble them like you would if you were making scrambled eggs. It’s totally okay if some of the veggies or rice get in with the eggs – it’s all going to mix together eventually anyway. But I try to keep the eggs separate for a while, so I know they’re getting cooked all the way.

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Then stir it all in! I don’t scramble the eggs all the way. I actually just get them close, so they’re still a little runny. I keep stirring for about three more minutes so the eggs have time to cook and then, voila!

stir fry

Stir Fry!

Here’s the quick and dirty version:

Tools You Need
Small pot for rice
Giant Pan
Spatula/Big Spoon

Food You Need
Onion – about 1/3
Garlic – however much you like, I use 4-5 cloves
Oil – any kind
Protein
Frozen Veggies (or not frozen; whatever you like)
Rice – 1 cup uncooked (you’ll need to cook it)
Soy Sauce – about a quarter cup
Seed/Nut – if you want
Spice – any kind of heat you like

Steps:
1. Start cooking rice. Chop onions and garlic.
2. Heat oil in a pan. Add onion and hard veggies (ex. carrots). Stir frequently. Chop protein into strips or cubes.
3. Add protein. Stir frequently.
4.  Once protein is cooked, add frozen (or not frozen) veggies. Stir frequently. Add heat, if you want it.
5. When rice is most of the way done, add rice to pan. Stir.
6. After a few minutes, push mixture to one side. Add four eggs. Scramble
7. Mix it all together.
8. Eat!

What’s in your favorite stir fry? Have you ever made it before? How did this recipe work out for you?

House List Update!

So, many moons ago, before I needed a break from blogging, I shared with you my House List, and how to prioritize that list. As of my most recent update about my couch, here’s what the list looked like:

Finallyfoundmy newhome! (1)

In my absence, I made some changes and now, here’s where we are:

Finallyfoundmy newhome! (2)

I’ve got some posts brewing about having made those changes, so I can explain the processes. But the real reason I wanted to give this update is because I first started talking about this a little less than a year ago and I’m not even halfway done.

That feels a little pathetic.

It also feels more than a little realistic.

I think it’s easy to get caught up in the idea of how quickly things should happen, or to compare ourselves to the work / rate of others. But, when I really think about, for as much as I love to tackle house projects and make my little apartment feel cozy, I’d rather lay out in the sunshine, or have some lemonade with my mom, or laugh with my friends.

d and j

I don’t actually think that life is too short. I think life is incredibly long and we should get everything we can out of it. And that means that some days I want to be barefoot in the sunshine, and other days, I want to paint little flowers on a flower pot.

I make a million lists and like to check things off of them and love the feeling of accomplishing both big and small projects – that will never not be true for me.

It’s also true that I still have a hard time not feeling guilty when I pick to hang out and live rather than be task-oriented, almost like I need permission to take a break.

So, here you go: an updated house list and permission to go take a break and play in the sunshine, or the rain; permission to go have the life you want.A. Rose (1)

Planner Inspiration

I basically live my life in my amazing planner.

IMG_3964.jpg

This system of putting to do lists over the top of the actual dates isn’t 100% the greatest. It’s been fine this summer, as I’m not taking classes, because I end up using a smaller sticky note and just have one. But the above photo is what my planner pretty much always looked like. #nothelpful

So, I’ve been thinking about making my own. Is that crazypants?

I started searching the internet for ideas.

I know that I mostly use the weekly view to list meetings, appointments and assignment due dates.

I basically don’t use the monthly view for anything, but I do make use of it.

I like the idea of having a little weekly planning page like this one:

Full-Size-To-Do-List-1468
Source

 

And some kind of meal planning page would be good, especially for during the school year:

weekly-meal-plan-template-weekday-meals-budget-elegant-planner

Source

Montly meal plan NO logo

Source

I also love this financial challenge spreadsheet:

52-Week-Money-Challenge
Source

And any kind of goal setting is also amazing:

goal planner
Source

 

Phew. That’s a lot. What do you all think? Is it crazy to create my own planner?

A. Rose (1)